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allthislife:

The Brown Girl’s Guide to Western Acceptance 

allthislife:

The Brown Girl’s Guide to Western Acceptance 

(via ladybrun)

At the beginning of the twenty-first century, Dubai erupted onto the world stage as a media and tourism spectacle. A small emirate that had transformed from an ancient mercantile port into a “global city” in a matter of decade, it was breaking world records and luring tourists and investors with man-made islands in the shape of palm trees and over-the-top luxury hotels and shopping malls. At the beginning of the millennium, Dubai seemed to many to exemplify what Jean and John Camaroff have described as “millennial capital” — a neoliberal fantasy-world of consumerism and real-estate speculation built on the backs of transnational, transient, majority proletariat population.

[…]

The human elements of the city seem to exist at extremes, with wealthy — and exploitative — Gulf Arabs and international business tycoons on one end, and the downtrodden construction and maids, mostly from South Asia, on the other. In fact, the majority of the attention to South Asians and other migrant groups in the Gulf, both popular and academic, echoes the Comaroff’s arguments about capitalism and class at the turn of the millennium by focusing either on the lack of human rights afforded to migrant workers, or on the absent of forms of civil society in the authoritarian Gulf sates that disfranchises both foreigners and citizens alike, albeit in different was. The millennial story about Dubai emphasizes a new form — or “second coming” — of rampant neoliberal capitalism, with both its spectacles and abuses. 

Neha Vora, Impossible Citizens: Dubai’s Indian Diaspora (via namumkin)

(via ladybrun)

person: “gosh at this rate everything is problematic, so just let me enjoy my racist content in peace!!” 

me: stop whining 

i had a dream that my mom wouldn’t drive me to my own arangetram and forced me to ride the city bus

-_________________- 

thegeekyblonde:

i like makeup! i got a turquoise eyeliner yesterday that’s really cute and i have 6 different shades of red lipstick! but that doesn’t change the fact that bosses discriminate against women who don’t wear makeup to work and pushing cosmetics onto girls screws up their self-esteem, which is why i’m careful talking about makeup with my younger cousins and the girls i babysit 

j6:

The Watermelon || Dome Nguyen

j6:

The Watermelon || Dome Nguyen

(via ajantas)

lightspeedsound:

kimchibae:

"dick is abundant and low value" i am screaming

omfg 

(via ladybrun)

arjuna-vallabha:

Temple jewellery from Tamil Nadu

(via ladybrun)

allthislife:

The Brown Girl’s Guide to Western Acceptance 

allthislife:

The Brown Girl’s Guide to Western Acceptance 

(via ladybrun)

At the beginning of the twenty-first century, Dubai erupted onto the world stage as a media and tourism spectacle. A small emirate that had transformed from an ancient mercantile port into a “global city” in a matter of decade, it was breaking world records and luring tourists and investors with man-made islands in the shape of palm trees and over-the-top luxury hotels and shopping malls. At the beginning of the millennium, Dubai seemed to many to exemplify what Jean and John Camaroff have described as “millennial capital” — a neoliberal fantasy-world of consumerism and real-estate speculation built on the backs of transnational, transient, majority proletariat population.

[…]

The human elements of the city seem to exist at extremes, with wealthy — and exploitative — Gulf Arabs and international business tycoons on one end, and the downtrodden construction and maids, mostly from South Asia, on the other. In fact, the majority of the attention to South Asians and other migrant groups in the Gulf, both popular and academic, echoes the Comaroff’s arguments about capitalism and class at the turn of the millennium by focusing either on the lack of human rights afforded to migrant workers, or on the absent of forms of civil society in the authoritarian Gulf sates that disfranchises both foreigners and citizens alike, albeit in different was. The millennial story about Dubai emphasizes a new form — or “second coming” — of rampant neoliberal capitalism, with both its spectacles and abuses. 

Neha Vora, Impossible Citizens: Dubai’s Indian Diaspora (via namumkin)

(via ladybrun)

(Source: malformalady, via ajantas)

person: “gosh at this rate everything is problematic, so just let me enjoy my racist content in peace!!” 

me: stop whining 

i had a dream that my mom wouldn’t drive me to my own arangetram and forced me to ride the city bus

-_________________- 

thegeekyblonde:

i like makeup! i got a turquoise eyeliner yesterday that’s really cute and i have 6 different shades of red lipstick! but that doesn’t change the fact that bosses discriminate against women who don’t wear makeup to work and pushing cosmetics onto girls screws up their self-esteem, which is why i’m careful talking about makeup with my younger cousins and the girls i babysit 

j6:

The Watermelon || Dome Nguyen

j6:

The Watermelon || Dome Nguyen

(via ajantas)

lightspeedsound:

kimchibae:

"dick is abundant and low value" i am screaming

omfg 

(via ladybrun)

greaterland:

New Zealand | Owen Spargo | Tumblr

(via ajantas)

arjuna-vallabha:

Temple jewellery from Tamil Nadu

(via ladybrun)

"

At the beginning of the twenty-first century, Dubai erupted onto the world stage as a media and tourism spectacle. A small emirate that had transformed from an ancient mercantile port into a “global city” in a matter of decade, it was breaking world records and luring tourists and investors with man-made islands in the shape of palm trees and over-the-top luxury hotels and shopping malls. At the beginning of the millennium, Dubai seemed to many to exemplify what Jean and John Camaroff have described as “millennial capital” — a neoliberal fantasy-world of consumerism and real-estate speculation built on the backs of transnational, transient, majority proletariat population.

[…]

The human elements of the city seem to exist at extremes, with wealthy — and exploitative — Gulf Arabs and international business tycoons on one end, and the downtrodden construction and maids, mostly from South Asia, on the other. In fact, the majority of the attention to South Asians and other migrant groups in the Gulf, both popular and academic, echoes the Comaroff’s arguments about capitalism and class at the turn of the millennium by focusing either on the lack of human rights afforded to migrant workers, or on the absent of forms of civil society in the authoritarian Gulf sates that disfranchises both foreigners and citizens alike, albeit in different was. The millennial story about Dubai emphasizes a new form — or “second coming” — of rampant neoliberal capitalism, with both its spectacles and abuses. 

"

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